Great KD (returnofthekd) wrote in outofboundsnews,
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Wrath of Debbie

Wrath of Debbie



Stock scam cons thousands, wrecks a marriage



A new telephone stock scam - which has burned thousands of gullible investors around the country - is now even being blamed for breaking up a marriage.
The scam involves an innocent sounding woman named Debbie who leaves a message "by mistake" on your answering machine for her friend Tracy touting a tip from a "hot stock exchange guy."

The idea is to trick you into investing in the phony tip by thinking you've gotten lucky. Then Debbie and her fellow con artists can sell their inflated shares at a big profit - leaving all the suckers to lose money.

Last week, when the Daily News first wrote about the scam, we asked you to tell us whether you'd ever gotten a phone message from the mysterious Debbie.

One couple who responded said Debbie had cost them more than just money. The wife - who asked that her name not be used - told The News she and her husband received a phone message from Debbie on their answering machine in which she touted the phony tip.

Unfortunately for the suspicious wife, the answering machine didn't record the first part of the stock tout message for Debbie's fictional friend.

But it did catch Debbie at the end of the message, saying: "I love you."

Four days of fighting later, the couple have divided their new Texas house in half - and her husband wants a divorce.

The woman says they can't reconcile after the bizarre mixup.

And she can't help thinking how much better life would be if Debbie hadn't called.

"I'm very angry," said the 43-year-old woman, who only learned of the scam after the damage was done. "What they did is unconscionable. I would like to see them go down."

Dave Dorsett, a 69-year-old cameraman who lives in Cranford, N.J., and works for the "Late Show With David Letterman," was at a house he owns in Fort Myers, Fla., checking on damage from Hurricane Charley when he got the call from Debbie.

"We just got phone service back, and this is one of my first calls," said Dorsett. "I couldn't believe it."

He insists he wasn't even slightly tempted. "Come on, we're New Yorkers. I knew it was a scam."

Others say the scam was convincing.

"We came close" to spending more than $2,000, said Joanne Miller of Spring Hill, Fla. Miller's sister Doreen Niestemski of Bayonne, N.J., eventually talked her out of it. "I smelled a rat," she said.

Steve Andree, a heavy equipment operator in Connecticut, also considered a purchase. "At first, you're wondering, if this is legit, is this your lucky day?"

New Jersey Assembly Banking and Insurance Committee Chairman Neil Cohen was stunned when he got one of these calls - and promised to take action.

Cohen is drafting legislation to boost civil penalties to 10 times the losses investors suffer.

Meanwhile, the bitter Texas woman is hoping she can go head to head with those who poisoned her marriage. "I'm praying that these people get caught," she said.
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KD EDITORIAL: I GOT ONE WORD FOR THEM ALL


SUCKERS!!!!!



HAHAHAAHAHAHAHAHA GOOD STUPID CHEAP JEW BASTARDS NOW ALL POOR.. LMAO.. GO DEBBIE GO!! GO!! GO!!
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